Tag Archives: Ayam

Ayam Bakar Sunda – Sundanese Grilled Chicken Recipe

Most people have a misconception that all Javanese dishes are invariably sweet, but the island of Java is home to many different ethnic groups and hence different cooking style, point in case, this grilled chicken from Sunda in West Java. I can guarantee that you won’t get that overt sweetness impression when you bite into the chicken, perfect for those who get sick from the cloying sweetness of Central Javanese dishes.

Drumsticks in Spice Broth.

Almost all traditional Indonesian grilled/fried chicken dishes is a two-step cooking process, braising (we call this ungkep) with a very low heat, and followed by quick grilling/frying. The two-step process may sound like a hassle, but in reality, this is a very smart way of preparing a large batch of chicken to last for many days. Once the chickens are braised, you can store them in fridge/freezer, and when you want to have some grilled/fried chicken, take out some from the fridge/freezer and return them to room temperature, then give them a quick fry/grill to heat the chickens and also to give a nice char.

Drumsticks braised in spiced broth.

Drumsticks braised in spiced broth.

I have found that one batch of the spice broth can be used to braise two batches of 10 chicken drumsticks, for a total of 20 chicken drumsticks. Most similar recipes always state to braise until the broth is all used up with the lid close. From my experience, it will take a really long braising time to use up all the liquid, and it is totally unnecessary, since at 1 hour, the chickens are already super tender and ready to fall off the bones. So what I usually do is to braise 10 drumsticks in my skillet for 1 hour, take those out, and then braise another 10 drumsticks for 1 hour for a total of 20 drumsticks.

Ayam Bakar Sunda - Sundanese Grilled Chicken

Ayam Bakar Sunda – Sundanese Grilled Chicken

Place the braised chicken in a colander/strainer to make sure the chickens are completely dry prior to frying/grilling, especially for frying if you don’t want to end up with crazy splatter all over your kitchen. If I am making a large batch like this, I usually end up broiling the chickens in my oven. First, line a baking tray with aluminum foil, brush each chicken generously with coconut oil (you can use any oil or even butter if you wish), then broil until the surface is charred, brushing more coconut oil as needed. If you are having a BBQ party in the near future, I am sure this is going to be a hit with your guests, and they don’t need to take a lot of time in the grill either, just enough to give some char.

Ayam Bakar Sunda - Sundanese Grilled Chicken

Ayam Bakar Sunda – Sundanese Grilled Chicken

You can eat the chicken as is, but I highly recommend making some sambal terasi or sambal bajak. A side of lalapan, or even some sliced cucumber, sliced tomato, and shredded cabbage/lettuce will be perfect to go along with the chicken.

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Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs Recipe

Bakso goreng or fried meatballs is one of Indonesian most beloved food. Bakso (meatballs) come in all sort of variety, fish, shrimp, chicken, pork, beef, and many combinations such as fish shrimp combo, chicken shrimp combo, pork chicken combo, e.t.c.

Once the meatball mixture is ready, it can be deep fried into bakso goreng (fried meatballs), or boiled into bakso kuah (meatballs soup).

Today, I am going to share my beloved bakso goreng ayam (fried chicken meatballs) recipe.

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso goreng secret #1: high fat content

Meatballs are best when made with meat with high fat content, as such I would suggest using chicken thigh with skin on and don’t remove any of the fatty bits to ensure a higher fat content.

Use a food processor to grind the chicken thigh and skin. Transfer the ground meat into a mixing bowl. Season with grated garlic, salt, pepper, sugar, chicken bouillon (or use more salt), and sesame oil. Mix well.

Slowly pour in ice cold water while stirring the meat mixture to incorporate. Add one chicken egg and mix again. Finally, add in tapioca starch and baking powder, and fold into the meat mixture.

Bakso Goreng Ayam - Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso goreng secret #2: ice cold bakso mixture vs. hot oil

One of the trick to get a crispier meatballs is to ensure the meat mixture is cold while the oil for deep frying is hot. As such, I like to chill the meat mixture in the fridge first for 1 hour at least prior to deep frying.

When you are ready to deep fry, prepare a pot of hot oil over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, remove the meat mixture from the fridge, and drop tablespoonful of meat mixture into the hot oil and fry until golden brown, about 4 minutes total.

Repeat this step until all the meat mixture is used up. These fried chicken meatballs are best serve piping hot, with some chili sauce, such as sambal lampung or garlic and chili sweet sauce, and/or tomato ketchup.

Bakso Goreng Ayam - Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs

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Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce Recipe

If you are in the mood for some spicy dish, may I suggest giving this ayam goreng saus tauco – fried chicken in spicy soy bean sauce a try? There is two parts to this dish, fried chicken pieces, and the spicy soy bean sauce. Once you master this recipe, feel free to switch the chicken with fish, tofu, or tempeh, and I guarantee it will work with any of my suggested substitute.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Fried chicken

For the juiciest possible result, stick with chicken thigh. That said, if all you have at home is chicken breast, it definitely will work so don’t worry too much about it. For a speedy cooking time, cut chicken thigh (or breast) into strips, and marinate with bruised (or roughly minced) garlic, lime juice, and salt. Once it has rested for 15 minutes, start preparing oil for deep frying. You can then whisk all purpose flour, tapioca starch (corn starch is okay too), and salt. Dump the chicken into the flour mixture and coat really really well, there shouldn’t be any liquid at all at this stage. Fry chicken until golden brown and set aside.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco - Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Tauco and Terasi/Belacan

Some of the key ingredients for this delicious sauce is tauco (salted soy beans) and terasi/belacan (shrimp paste). The links I provide are for products that should be available in your Asian market, such as Marina or 99 Ranch. Of course, you can always buy from Amazon, but the price is more expensive online. Another ingredient that you may consider getting online is Indonesian bay leaves (Indonesian: daun salam). You cannot substitute regular bay leaves with Indonesian bay leaves, and if you cannot get them, my suggestion is to omit from the recipe.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco - Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Once you have all the ingredients for the sauce together, first, make the spice paste by grinding with a food processor/blender. I find that if I add a teaspoon of oil into my food processor along with the ingredients, the blended paste is much smoother. To prepare for the spicy soy bean sauce, simply fry the spice paste, lemongrass, and Indonesian bay leaves until fragrant. Add tauco, sugar, mix well, then add water and bring to a boil. Once the sauce is reduced and look slightly dry, add fried chicken to the pan and toss to coat well. It is best to serve this dish hot with some steamed white rice.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco - Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

The Recipe

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Ayam Suwir Tauco Pedas – Spicy Soy Bean Shredded Chicken Recipe

Ayam suwir (shredded chicken) is one of Indonesian favorite comfort food. The idea is to poach one whole chicken, or in the US, just a pair of chicken breasts since the chicken in US is humongous compared to the one back home. Then, the chicken meat is shredded and cook further in a myriad way. Today, I am going to share this easy ayam suwir tauco pedas – spicy soy bean shredded chicken recipe with you.

Ayam Suwir Tauco Pedas – Spicy Soy Bean Shredded Chicken

Let’s Get Cooking

Once you have your poached chicken, the rest is a simple stir frying job.

First, sauté the aromatics (shallot, garlic, daun salam, and galangal) over medium high heat.

Next, add chilies, tauco, shredded chicken, all the seasonings and water/stock. Simply cook until liquid is almost dry and you have yourself an ayam suwir dish.

If you want an even easier approach, get a rotisserie chicken, and use that instead of poached chicken. The rotisserie trick makes this simple dish even simpler, and to be honest, the taste is even better.

Ayam Suwir Tauco Pedas - Spicy Soy Bean Shredded Chicken

Ayam Suwir Tauco Pedas – Spicy Soy Bean Shredded Chicken

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Kari Ayam Lengkuas – Galangal Chicken Curry Recipe

Curries and coconut milk are such a classic pairing that when I came across one without any coconut milk, it piqued my interest. The curry does look thinner than the one I am used to, but this kari ayam lengkuas – galangal chicken curry tastes mighty delicious and I don’t miss the coconut milk at all. If you are looking for a healthier curry, you definitely need to give this a try.

Kari Ayam Lengkuas – Galangal Chicken Curry

Potato is Key

The key to the creamy curry sauce without coconut milk is potato. I add plenty of skillet fried potato wedges to the curry, and when some of those melt at the end of the cooking time, it makes the curry thick and creamy. Plus, potato is like a blank canvas that absorbs all the flavor from the curry. This is one dish that the potato might actually outshines the chicken.

Kari Ayam Lengkuas - Galangal Chicken Curry

Kari Ayam Lengkuas – Galangal Chicken Curry

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Kroket Ragout Ayam – Chicken Ragout Croquette Recipe

Indonesia inherit croquette from its Dutch colonial past. There are a lot of croquette varieties, but basic Indonesian croquette has savory filling wrapped in mashed potato, coated with egg and bread crumbs and deep fried until golden brown. The most common and popular one is probably kroket ragout ayam – chicken ragout croquette, but nowadays there are many new and creative filling, such as kroket rendang!

Kroket Ragout Ayam – Chicken Ragout Croquette

Multi Stages Prep Work

Be warned that croquettes takes time to prepare. Start one day ahead to prepare the skin (mashed potato) and filling (chicken ragout). Place each in a mixing bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and chill in the fridge. Next day, take both bowls out from the fridge and divide each into 16 portions. Crack 2 eggs (sometimes I need 3) in a bowl, and fill another bowl with bread crumbs (~ 2 cups). Take a portion of potato skin and flatten, fill with a portion of filling, gently gather the potato to wrap the filling and roll into a cylindrical shape. Coat with bread crumbs, then dip in eggs, and coat again with bread crumbs. Once you have shaped all the croquettes, simply heat up some oil for deep frying and fry until golden brown.

Kroket Ragout Ayam - Chicken Ragout Croquette

Kroket Ragout Ayam – Chicken Ragout Croquette

The Easier Way

Once you get the basic idea of how to prepare Indonesian croquette, you can start playing around with variety of filling. In my next recipe, I will show you how to prepare kroket panggang – baked croquette. With baking method, you can very easily prepare and serve croquette. Best of all, no shaping individual croquette, and no deep frying. If this sounds like your cup of tea, be sure to stay tune for my next croquette recipe.

Kroket Ragout Ayam - Chicken Ragout Croquette

Kroket Ragout Ayam – Chicken Ragout Croquette

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Laksa Ayam Jakarta – Chicken Coconut Milk Soup Recipe

The weather is getting cold, the snow is falling, and people are trying to stay warm. It is wintertime in Minnesota, and most definitely a perfect time to cook up a batch of laksa ayam Jakarta (chicken coconut milk soup). Spicy hot soup is just the perfect remedy for cold weather, don’t you think? 🙂 Serve this spicy chicken soup with some boiled rice vermicellis (Indonesian: bihun rebus) or steamed white rice (Indonesian: nasi putih) and be ready for a second or third helping.

Laksa Ayam – Chicken Coconut Milk Soup

What is laksa?

Laksa is a spicy noodle soup dish popular in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Southern Thailand. This dish is particularly popular among Chinese descent and is one of the more popular dishes of Peranakan cuisine. Since laksa is such a popular dish in so many different countries, each country, and even each region within a country, has its own distinct variety of laksa. Just in Indonesia alone, we have laksa Medan, laksa Palembang, laksa Bogor, laksa Tangerang, and laksa Jakarta. The laksa recipe I share today is the one that is popular in Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia.

What ingredients do I need to prepare laksa ayam Jakarta (Jakarta style chicken laksa)?

Laksa Jakarta, similar to other laksa varieties, is full of spices and herbs, and we will indeed be using plenty of those. First, there’s the laksa spice paste, which is made from:

  • shallots
  • garlic
  • ginger
  • ground coriander
  • ground turmeric
  • ground cumin
  • ebi (dried tiny shrimps)
  • red chilies, I only use Fresno chilies, but you can also add bird-eye chilies for a spicier laksa

Then, we will also need these to complete the laksa:

  • chicken breast/thigh, we are making chicken laksa after all
  • chicken stock
  • coconut milk
  • lemongrass
  • kaffir lime leaves
  • scallions/green onions
  • coriander leaves
Laksa Ayam - Chicken Coconut Milk Soup

Laksa Ayam – Chicken Coconut Milk Soup

What is ebi and how do I use this?

Ebi is dried tiny shrimps. You may have spotted these sold in little plastic packets in the refrigerated section in your Asian/Chinese market. These little guys will add so much flavor to your soup, and to be honest, laksa Jakarta just doesn’t taste quite right without them.

How do I use ebi?

To use ebi, simply measure the needed amount, then wash and soak in cold water until slightly puffy and soft. Then you can ground this with the rest of the spice paste ingredients in a blender/food processor to make the laksa spice paste.

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Bubur Ayam – Chicken Congee Recipe

Congee is comfort food for most Asian and there is a wide variety depending on countries and regions. Today I am going to focus on Indonesian bubur ayam – chicken congee.

This version of congee is the kind you find being sold by hawkers at almost every side street in the country. If you ever visit Indonesia, you must give it a try even at the risk of stomach discomfort!

My tip to staying safe from eating side street food is to stick to the ones crowded with mobs of hungry buyers. Those usually sell delicious food at a very reasonable price and with minimal risk from getting food poisoning.

If you want to try at your own home, you can, of course, follow this recipe 🙂

Bubur Ayam – Chicken Congee

What’s considered as a complete bubur ayam

Taking an analogy from the world of music, bubur ayam is an orchestra, and not a single piece.

It means bubur ayam is not just about the congee.

It is also about the chicken simmered in spiced broth, then lightly fried and shredded.

It is the said broth, strained, and serve along with the congee.

And of course, let us not forget the numerous sides that accompany the congee.

Some of the must-have sides include:

  • cakwe (Chinese crullers), cut into thin pieces.
  • prawn crackers, or onion crackers (Indonesian: kerupuk udang, or kerupuk bawang)
  • fried peanuts
  • chopped fresh scallions and cilantro leaves
  • fried shallots (Indonesian: bawang goreng)
  • sambal (chili sauce), Sriracha or sambal oelek is a good choice if you don’t have the time to make homemade sambal. For those of us grew up eating this from the various bubur sellers in Jakarta, you probably want to make some sambal kacang.
  • kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce), I prefer Bango brand over ABC brand, but both are delicious with this congee.

If you cannot make the complete set of sides, I highly recommend to at least have the cakwe/Chinese crullers and some chopped fresh scallions and cilantro along with the congee, fried chicken, and the chicken broth.

Bubur Ayam - Chicken Congee

Bubur Ayam – Chicken Congee

What’s in my bubur ayam recipe

I aim to provide the minimum required components to prepare a complete Indonesian style bubur ayam, so you will be able to make the following with this recipe:

  • the congee itself,
  • the fried chicken, and
  • the chicken broth.

I already share my cakwe/Chinese crullers recipe in the previous post if you are up to the challenge of making some at home.

If you have access to a pretty well-stocked Chinese grocery, there is a high chance that they will sell it in their frozen section.

The same goes for prawn crackers and kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce), just not in the frozen aisle of course 🙂

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Pempek Ayam Lenjer – Fried Chicken Sticks Recipe

Pempek is Indonesian fish cakes, very similar to Japanese fish cakes. Our pempek is made from a mixture of ground fish and tapioca flour and comes in various shapes.

Regardless of their shapes, they are first boiled, then fried, and finally cut into small pieces, and served with saus cuko, a rather thick, spicy, and sweet tamarind sauce.

Pempek is primarily made from ikan tenggiri (spanish mackerel). But you can make it with other white firm flesh fish too, like cod. Today I am going to share with you a rather unexpected recipe for pempek ayam lenjer – fried chicken sticks using ground chicken!

Pempek Ayam Lenjer – Fried Chicken Sticks

Anchovy stocks and ground dried shrimps to rescue

This ground chicken pempek tastes very similar to Indonesian pempek, and most probably cannot tell they are not made from fish if you don’t reveal the secret.

To trick our tastebuds, you will need some anchovy stock and some ground dried shrimps. You can use Korean anchovy dashida, or buy Korean anchovies and ground into powder.

The dried shrimps are used in the sauce, but if you don’t want to buy another product, you can also just use the same anchovy stock for the sauce.

Another alternative if you don’t have anchovy stock is to use Japanese dashi stock. Your pempek will still have that desired fish flavor, but I prefer the one with anchovy stock.

Pempek Ayam Lenjer - Fried Chicken Sticks

Pempek Ayam Lenjer – Fried Chicken Sticks

There is no need to fry them all!

This recipe makes a rather large batch of pempek. You can freeze some of the pempek after step 5 and fry in the future as needed.

You need to follow the recipe up to step 5, that is, until the boiling step.

Once boiled and chilled to room temperature, wrap each log with a saran wrap, then store them in a large freezer bag.

When you want to have some pempek, grab some of the frozen boiled chicken sticks and let them thaw, then proceed from step 6.

Pempek Ayam Lenjer - Fried Chicken Sticks

Pempek Ayam Lenjer – Fried Chicken Sticks

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Semur Ayam Medan Recipe | Daily Cooking Quest

One of my favorite food is semur ayam, and it has been so since I was just a little kid. I grew up in Medan before moving to the capital city when I was twelve.

Semur is easy to find in both cities, but there are significant differences between the two versions. In Medan version, chicken are first fried until the skin is crispy. Also, Medan version uses coconut milk instead of water.

I definitely prefer semur ayam Medan – Medan style chicken in nutmeg & sweet soy sauce, but it may just be my bias. So feel free to try this and the more common Javanese version and then decide which one you like best.

Semur Ayam Medan – Medan Style Chicken in Nutmeg & Sweet Soy Sauce

Must-Have: Kecap Manis

Cooking abroad means sometimes you must make do with compromises. Some ingredients are quite okay to be substituted, but some you definitely must hunt them down.

Case in point, you can’t make a proper semur without Indonesian kecap manis. It should be easier now to buy kecap manis in the States.

I currently live in a tiny city in Minnesota, and all the Chinese/Asian/South East Asian groceries have them. If you need to buy them online, I think ABC Bali is the cheapest option, but only if you go through gallons of them, like most Indonesians I know 🙂

If you only use kecap manis sparingly, just stick to ABC or Bango.

Semur Ayam Medan - Medan Style Chicken in Nutmeg & Sweet Soy Sauce

Semur Ayam Medan – Medan Style Chicken in Nutmeg & Sweet Soy Sauce

Some Substitutions

Of course, some ingredients are okay to be substituted.

Original version uses Indonesian bawang merah, which I sometimes encounter. French shallot is very similar to bawang merah, but typically three times larger, and is the best substitute for bawang merah.

When even French shallots mysteriously disappear (which was the case when I took this photo), I use regular onion. It’s okay for recipe like this, but it is definitely not okay when you are making acar.

Another ingredients that can be safely substituted is kemiri (candlenuts). Any Indonesian recipe calls for kemiri, you can safely substitute with equal weight macadamia nuts.

Semur Ayam Medan - Medan Style Chicken in Nutmeg & Sweet Soy Sauce

Semur Ayam Medan – Medan Style Chicken in Nutmeg & Sweet Soy Sauce

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