Tag Archives: Cassava

Gulai Daun Singkong – Cassava (Yam) Leaves Curry Recipe

Ingredients to prepare gulai daun singkong: cassava/yam leaves, coconut milk, shallots, garlic, red chilies, ginger, galangal, candlenuts, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, coriander, turmeric, salt, and sugar.

Padang cuisine is definitely one of my favorite Indonesian cuisines. And whenever I have the chance to visit a Padang restaurant, it is almost a certainty that I will grab some gulai daun singkong among the mountain of dishes to choose from.

I mean, have you ever walked into a Padang restaurant? The display of so many dishes, stacked like mountains, is the main draw, and the smell, of course.

It is always so difficult to decide which dishes to get, but this unassuming curry is so full of flavor, and to me, a proper nasi Padang is not complete without it.

What do I need to prepare gulai daun singkong Padang?

Like most Padang dishes, the ingredients list for this dish is quite long. You will need:

  • daun singkong (yam/cassava/sweet potato leaves). These are sold as yam leaves in my nearby Asian market. For this specific dish, kale is the best substitute if you cannot find daun singkong in your grocery store.
  • coconut milk
  • ground coriander (Indonesian: bubuk ketumbar)
  • ground turmeric (Indonesian: bubuk kunyit). You can use fresh turmeric too if you wish.
  • shallots. I use smaller Asian/Chinese shallots, but feel free to use regular French shallots too. Just go by weight measurement to make sure you don’t use too many shallots. 🙂
  • garlic
  • red chilies. I use red Fresno chilies, but you can use red cayenne, or even red bird-eye chilies if you really love spicy dishes.
  • ginger
  • galangal
  • candlenuts (Indonesian: kemiri). You can substitute this with the same amount of macadamia nuts.
  • lemongrass
  • daun salam (Indonesian bay leaves). These are not the same as regular bay leaves. If you can’t find these, it is best to omit.
  • kaffir lime leaves (Indonesian: daun jeruk). Added at the very last minute to impart some fresh citrus note. This is optional and can be omitted.
  • salt
  • sugar
Top: cassava/yam leaves. Bottom: ground spice paste for the curry.

Top: cassava/yam leaves. Bottom: ground spice paste for the curry.

How do I prepare yam leaves?

From the market, yam leaves are sold attached to their stalks. Try to break the stalks, if they are fibrous looking, simply use the leaves. If the stalks are tender and not fibrous at all, feel free to include the stalks too in the dish. Regardless, please do the following to prep your yam leaves:

  1. Pinch off each leaf and its stem from the main stalk.
  2. If the main stalk has tender parts, usually more towards the top near where all the leaves are, pinch of those parts too. Probably 50% of the time, you will find that the main stalk will be too tough/fibrous to be used.
  3. Wash and rinse thoroughly under cold running water to remove dirt.
  4. Set aside to drain excess water before cooking.
Gulai daun singkong - cassava (yam) leaves curry.

Gulai daun singkong – cassava (yam) leaves curry.

How do I cook gulai daun singkong?

Here is how I cook gulai daun singkong at home:

  1. Prep the daun singkong (yam leaves) as described in the previous section.
  2. Grind the spice paste. I use a food processor for this. You can use a blender, or even traditional mortar and pestle if that’s what you have.
  3. Heat cooking oil in a wok/pot/deep skillet (I use a wok), and fry the spice paste until fragrant, about 3-5 minutes.
  4. Add daun salam (if using) and lemongrass, cook for another 2 minutes.
  5. Add yam leaves and water into the wok, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes.
  6. Add coconut milk, salt, and sugar. Continue simmering for 5 minutes.
  7. Add kaffir lime leaves (if using), and stir for 1 minute. Turn off heat, and serve immediately with steamed white rice.
Gulai daun singkong - cassava (yam) leaves curry.

Gulai daun singkong – cassava (yam) leaves curry.

Other Padang dishes recipes to try

If you love this gulai daun singkong and would love to try cooking other Padang restaurant dishes at home. Please give these recipes a try:

Untuk info lebih lanjut,
klik disini

Ongol-Ongol Singkong – Steamed Cassava Cake Recipe

Ongol-ongol singkong (Indonesian steamed cassava cake with grated coconut).

Ongol-ongol is a traditional Indonesian cake. It has a slightly chewy texture, a sweet fragrant aroma, and we always serve it with grated coconut.

If this is your first time trying an ongol-ongol, you may find that the texture is very different than a typical baked cake using flour, butter, egg, and sugar.

If, on the other hand, you are familiar with Malaysian kuih or other Indonesian traditional steamed cakes, then you won’t be surprised by the texture when you take a bite. 🙂

If you live near an Asian grocery store, it should be easy to find all the necessary ingredients to prepare this simple and lovely cake. I also think this is a nice introduction to Indonesian more traditional cakes/snacks. 🙂

Ingredients for ongol-ongol singkong (steamed cassava cake): grated cassava, grated coconut, coconut milk, agar powder, pandan, vanilla, sugar, and salt.

Ingredients for ongol-ongol singkong (steamed cassava cake): grated cassava, grated coconut, coconut milk, agar powder, pandan, vanilla, sugar, and salt.

Ingredients for Indonesian steamed cassava cake

1. Grated cassava

I usually get a packet of frozen grated cassava. A one-pound (450 gram) packet is the perfect amount to make this cake.

If you get fresh cassava, you can peel and grate the root. I choose to use frozen grated cassava since this makes the recipe easier to tackle.

2. Coconut milk

Please use canned coconut milk and not boxed coconut milk. In the US, boxed coconut milk is thinner than canned coconut milk, and the viscosity is closer to fresh milk.

3. Agar powder

You will need a 7-gram pouch of agar powder for this recipe. I prefer to get a small bottle of agar powder that I can use for multiple recipes.

4. Grated coconut

You should be able to find packets of frozen grated coconut in a well-stocked Asian market. You can also buy a fresh mature coconut, crack it open, and grate its flesh.

If you live in Indonesia or other Asian countries, you can buy a fresh mature coconut from a market and has the seller open and grate it for you. 🙂

5. Pandan

We use pandan leaves to impart their lovely fragrance to the grated coconut. If you can’t find any, it is okay to omit this, and your grated coconut will still have a fresh coconut aroma.

6. Sugar, salt, and vanilla

(1) Stir grated cassava, coconut milk, sugar, salt, agar powder, and vanilla. (2) Pour the batter into an 8-inch round pan. (3) Steam for 50 minutes and cool completely. (4) Steam grated coconut, salt, and pandan leaves.

(1) Stir grated cassava, coconut milk, sugar, salt, agar powder, and vanilla. (2) Pour the batter into an 8-inch round pan. (3) Steam for 50 minutes and cool completely. (4) Steam grated coconut, salt, and pandan leaves.

Prepare and steam the cassava cake

Prepare a steamer big enough to fit an 8-inch round pan. Fill the steamer pot with enough water for an hour of steaming, and start boiling the water while preparing the cake batter over medium heat.

Stir grated cassava, coconut milk, vanilla, agar powder, sugar, and salt in a mixing bowl until smooth. Pour the batter into the cake pan.

Once the steamer is ready – the water is boiling, and there is plenty of steam – place the pan in the steamer and steam the cake for 50-60 minutes.

Remove the cake from the steamer and set it aside to cool and firm up. You can chill the cake in the fridge to cool it faster.

Remove cassava cake from the pan, cut into serving pieces, and serve with pandan scented grated coconut.

Remove cassava cake from the pan, cut into serving pieces, and serve with pandan scented grated coconut.

Prepare and steam grated coconut

I highly suggest steaming the grated coconut on the day you plan to serve the cake since the grated coconut usually spoils faster than the cake itself.

Mix grated coconut with salt in a steam-proof bowl, top with knotted pandan leave, and steam for 15 minutes.

Option 1: cut into small half-inch pieces and toss with grated coconut.

Option 1: cut into small half-inch pieces and toss with grated coconut.

Serving the cake

There are two ways to serve this cake:

Option 1

Cut the cake into small half-inch pieces, place in a mixing bowl, add the grated coconut, and toss to coat the cakes evenly.

Option 2

Cut the cake into 2-inch pieces, arrange them on a serving tray/platter, and sprinkle the top with grated coconut.

Option 1 is more suitable for daily snacking or informal gatherings, and option 2 is better when you want a lovelier presentation. The cassava cakes will be delicious regardless of how you present them.

Option 2: cut into small 2-inch pieces, arrange on a serving tray, and sprinkle the top with grated coconut.

Option 2: cut into small 2-inch pieces, arrange on a serving tray, and sprinkle the top with grated coconut.

Make a layered cassava cake

You can turn this cake into a three-layer cake, with a different color for each layer, typically red, green, and yellow (plain). We call this a kue lapis singkong (layered cassava cake).

I suggest going with a 6-inch round pan if you want to turn this into a layer cake. The layers will be too thin in an 8-inch round pan.

To make the layered look, divide the batter into three portions. Add a drop of red food coloring to one batter, add a drop of green food coloring to another batter, and leave the third batter plain.

Pour the first batter into the cake pan and steam for 15 minutes to get the first layer. Pour the second batter over the first layer and steam for another 15 minutes. Finally, pour the third portion to create the final layer and steam for 20 minutes.

Untuk info lebih lanjut,
klik disini