Tag Archives: Goreng

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs Recipe

Bakso goreng or fried meatballs is one of Indonesian most beloved food. Bakso (meatballs) come in all sort of variety, fish, shrimp, chicken, pork, beef, and many combinations such as fish shrimp combo, chicken shrimp combo, pork chicken combo, e.t.c.

Once the meatball mixture is ready, it can be deep fried into bakso goreng (fried meatballs), or boiled into bakso kuah (meatballs soup).

Today, I am going to share my beloved bakso goreng ayam (fried chicken meatballs) recipe.

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso goreng secret #1: high fat content

Meatballs are best when made with meat with high fat content, as such I would suggest using chicken thigh with skin on and don’t remove any of the fatty bits to ensure a higher fat content.

Use a food processor to grind the chicken thigh and skin. Transfer the ground meat into a mixing bowl. Season with grated garlic, salt, pepper, sugar, chicken bouillon (or use more salt), and sesame oil. Mix well.

Slowly pour in ice cold water while stirring the meat mixture to incorporate. Add one chicken egg and mix again. Finally, add in tapioca starch and baking powder, and fold into the meat mixture.

Bakso Goreng Ayam - Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso goreng secret #2: ice cold bakso mixture vs. hot oil

One of the trick to get a crispier meatballs is to ensure the meat mixture is cold while the oil for deep frying is hot. As such, I like to chill the meat mixture in the fridge first for 1 hour at least prior to deep frying.

When you are ready to deep fry, prepare a pot of hot oil over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, remove the meat mixture from the fridge, and drop tablespoonful of meat mixture into the hot oil and fry until golden brown, about 4 minutes total.

Repeat this step until all the meat mixture is used up. These fried chicken meatballs are best serve piping hot, with some chili sauce, such as sambal lampung or garlic and chili sweet sauce, and/or tomato ketchup.

Bakso Goreng Ayam - Fried Chicken Meatballs

Bakso Goreng Ayam – Fried Chicken Meatballs

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Talas Goreng – Taro Fritters Recipe

When I was still in primary school, one of my favorite snack is talas goreng (taro fritters) sold nearby my school. The seller has a metal box attached to the back of his bicycle, and in it are the perfectly fried taro fritters. Once an order is placed, he would cut each taro fritter into smaller bite size pieces (we are all tiny back then), place the taro pieces in a super eco friendly dish made from banana leaves, pour some chili sauce on the taro fritters, and lastly stick a piece of bamboo skewer before handing the whole thing to the hungry little customers. So, so, so good.

Taro Julienne

Before we can make some taro fritters, we will need some taro root, some dried shrimps (Indonesian: ebi), and salted soy beans (Indonesian: tauco). We will also need tapioca starch, all purpose flour, rice flour, garlic, salt, and sugar. You should be able to find dried shrimps in the frozen sections alongside salted fish, salted squid, e.t.c., or you can get one from Amazon too if that’s easier. For salted soy beans, the brand that I like most that I can find in United States here is Yeo’s salted soy beans, you can use other brand too of course.

Talas Goreng - Taro Fritters

Talas Goreng – Taro Fritters

First of all, let’s make taro juliennes/sticks with either a grater or a knife, then place them in a mixing bowl and set aside. Make spice paste by grinding together soaked dried shrimps, salted soy beans, and garlic in a food processor. Combine spice paste with the taro juliennes, then add tapioca starch, all purpose flour, rice flour, sugar, salt, and water, mixing everything together into a thick batter. Finally, we can start frying the batter to make taro fritters, either with deep frying or pan frying.

Talas Goreng - Taro Fritters

Talas Goreng – Taro Fritters

It is best to enjoy taro fritters when they are piping hot. A dab of chili sauce, such as sambal lampung (lampung chili sauce) or garlic and chili sweet sauce, goes really well with the fritters.

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Tahu Goreng Sambal Sereh – Fried Tofu with Spicy Lemongrass Relish Recipe

Our family is tofu lovers, so our tofu recipes have been growing nicely over the years. If you need a new tofu recipe, do give this tahu goreng sambal sereh – fried tofu with spicy lemongrass relish a try.

If you can buy freshly fried tofu cubes in side street or supermarket, the only thing you need to do is to prepare the spicy relish.

Tahu Goreng Sambal Sereh – Fried Tofu with Spicy Lemongrass Relish

Fried Tofu Cubes

If you need to prepare fried tofu cubes on your own, the most important thing to remember is to properly drain as much liquid as possible from the tofu.

Since this is a super important step, you can even buy tofu presser to do this step for you.

But, I usually just wrap firm tofu with paper towel, sandwich between two plates and place my heavy cast iron skillet on top.

I recommend letting the tofu drain for at least 30 minutes, though I usually leave them for one hour.

Once it is drained, simply cut the tofu into cubes, sprinkle with salt and pepper, coat with flour, and pan fry until golden brown.

Tahu Goreng Sambal Sereh - Fried Tofu with Spicy Lemongrass Relish

Tahu Goreng Sambal Sereh – Fried Tofu with Spicy Lemongrass Relish

Spicy Lemongrass Relish

This spicy relish is simple to make as long as you have the ingredients. The spices include lemongrass, shallot, garlic, red Thai bird eye chilies, and for the seasoning, salt and pepper.

Heat oil in a frying pan and sauté thinly sliced lemongrass, shallot, chilies, and minced garlic.

Once it is fragrant, season with salt and pepper. Arrange fried tofu cubes in a plate and top with the spicy lemongrass relish.

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Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce Recipe

If you are in the mood for some spicy dish, may I suggest giving this ayam goreng saus tauco – fried chicken in spicy soy bean sauce a try? There is two parts to this dish, fried chicken pieces, and the spicy soy bean sauce. Once you master this recipe, feel free to switch the chicken with fish, tofu, or tempeh, and I guarantee it will work with any of my suggested substitute.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Fried chicken

For the juiciest possible result, stick with chicken thigh. That said, if all you have at home is chicken breast, it definitely will work so don’t worry too much about it. For a speedy cooking time, cut chicken thigh (or breast) into strips, and marinate with bruised (or roughly minced) garlic, lime juice, and salt. Once it has rested for 15 minutes, start preparing oil for deep frying. You can then whisk all purpose flour, tapioca starch (corn starch is okay too), and salt. Dump the chicken into the flour mixture and coat really really well, there shouldn’t be any liquid at all at this stage. Fry chicken until golden brown and set aside.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco - Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Tauco and Terasi/Belacan

Some of the key ingredients for this delicious sauce is tauco (salted soy beans) and terasi/belacan (shrimp paste). The links I provide are for products that should be available in your Asian market, such as Marina or 99 Ranch. Of course, you can always buy from Amazon, but the price is more expensive online. Another ingredient that you may consider getting online is Indonesian bay leaves (Indonesian: daun salam). You cannot substitute regular bay leaves with Indonesian bay leaves, and if you cannot get them, my suggestion is to omit from the recipe.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco - Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Once you have all the ingredients for the sauce together, first, make the spice paste by grinding with a food processor/blender. I find that if I add a teaspoon of oil into my food processor along with the ingredients, the blended paste is much smoother. To prepare for the spicy soy bean sauce, simply fry the spice paste, lemongrass, and Indonesian bay leaves until fragrant. Add tauco, sugar, mix well, then add water and bring to a boil. Once the sauce is reduced and look slightly dry, add fried chicken to the pan and toss to coat well. It is best to serve this dish hot with some steamed white rice.

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco - Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

Ayam Goreng Saus Tauco – Fried Chicken in Spicy Soy Bean Sauce

The Recipe

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Ayam Goreng Rica-Rica – Tomato & Chili Fried Chicken Recipe

Rica-rica is a famous spicy sauce used widely in Manado cuisine from the province of North Sulawesi in Indonesia. The first time I tried this sauce in a Manado restaurant, my tongue went numb and my eyes couldn’t stop tearing. I even ended up with a stomach upset from all the chilies. But don’t worry. This recipe for ayam goreng rica-rica – tomato & chili fried chicken is a tone down version from the original. Trust me, you need to build up your body tolerance before trying an authentic rica-rica!

Ayam Goreng Rica-Rica – Tomato & Chili Fried Chicken

Rica-rica sauce

The most obvious thing that will jump up when you encounter a true rica-rica dish is the absurdly insane amount of Thai bird eye chilies that greet your eyes. A super authentic recipe commonly calls for something in the order of 20-30 chilies! I’m going to chicken out and use only 2 in this recipe. To make up for the lack of red color from using only 2 chilies, I am compensating with 3 tomatoes, otherwise the color will be super off. You will also need shallot, garlic, scallions, salt, and sugar. If you wish, you can also add a lemongrass and a couple of kaffir lime leaves, but the dish is more than acceptable even without these two ingredients.

Ayam Goreng Rica-Rica - Tomato & Chili Fried Chicken

Ayam Goreng Rica-Rica – Tomato & Chili Fried Chicken

Fried chicken, two versions

This is at least my 10th post using the same fried chicken recipe. If you follow my recipes, you probably have memorized it by heart 🙂 As always, I prefer deep frying the chicken strips. But if you really must use oven, please refer to my orange hoisin chicken stir fry recipe to oven “fry” chicken strips.

Ayam Goreng Rica-Rica - Tomato & Chili Fried Chicken

Ayam Goreng Rica-Rica – Tomato & Chili Fried Chicken

The Recipe

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Pisang Goreng Madu Recipe | Daily Cooking Quest

Anyone who grows up in Indonesian definitely has a fond memory of pisang goreng (banana fritters). It is the most ubiquitous street food snack, a perennial favorite for all ages, from little kids to grandmas and grandpas. Here I added honey to the batter to produce pisang goreng madu (honey batter fried bananas).

Pisang Goreng Madu – Honey Batter Banana Fritters

Pisang kepok (saba bananas)

We don’t typically use eating bananas (a.k.a. cavendish bananas) for deep frying, or any sort of banana dish that needs cooking for that matter. Instead, we either use sabana banana (Indonesian: pisang kepok) or plaintain (Indonesian: pisang tanduk). Either one is fine for this recipe, but I stick to saba banana since that is the most common banana for making pisang goreng. Also, you want to wait for the bananas to ripen before using them. I usually wait patiently until the skins are all yelllow and even develop plenty of dark spots before turning them into fritters!

Pisang Goreng Madu - Honey Batter Banana Fritters

Pisang Goreng Madu – Honey Batter Banana Fritters

Tips for crispy fritters

Everyone loves crispy fritters, and I have two tips to help ensure your banana fritters have crispy skin. First, make sure the oil is hot before starting to deep fry. If you have a cooking thermometer, you want to start frying once the oil reaches 170 Celsius/340 Fahrenheit. Second, make sure your water to make the batter is super cold. If you have ice cubes in your freezer, it can really help if you throw in extra 5-6 ice cubes to keep the batter as cold as possible.

Pisang Goreng Madu - Honey Batter Banana Fritters

Pisang Goreng Madu – Honey Batter Banana Fritters

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Mi Goreng Kampung Recipe | Daily Cooking Quest

A plate of freshly fried mi goreng probably occupies the top spot in my list of comfort food. When I don’t feel like eating rice, I always make some fried noodles and it will definitely cheer me up like no other food can. To be honest, the reason I haven’t shared a mi goreng recipe is because this is one of those recipes that feels weird to have a set rule. Please use the recipe as a rough guide and free style it to suit your taste.

Mi Goreng Kampung – Indonesian Fried Noodles.

Which noodles?

To start, most Indonesian use Chinese fresh egg noodles to fry some mi goreng. If I were in Indonesia, I would definitely be using this since it is so commonly available one can even just pop in to the nearest convenient store to grab a packet. But since I now live in the States, a packet of fresh egg noodles is suddenly a luxury item, so I have been forced to make do with dried noodles.

I have tried this with everything from egg noodles to udon to all kind of Asian wheat noodles, so I know it will work regardless of which noodles you choose.

The key is to undercook the noodles from what is stated on the instruction label. For example, if your packet says to cook the for 5 minutes, I suggest stopping at 3.5 minutes, or 4 minutes, at most. This is because when we fry the noodles, it will be cooked further. If you already cook the noodle to its suggested time, your mi goreng will end up soggy, which is not good.

Mi Goreng Kampung - Indonesian Fried Noodles.

Mi Goreng Kampung – Indonesian Fried Noodles.

Use any vegetable/meat

There is only a very basic rule to fry up a batch of mi goreng. Most people include garlic, egg, kecap manis, and bawang goreng (fried scallion) as essential, which I wholeheartedly agree. To that, I would add fish sauce, pepper, and scallions. There should also be a mix of vegetables and meat, and here is where you can use whatever you like.

My usual go to is some thinly sliced cabbage and carrot, and some sort of bakso (meatballs) or fish cakes, or any thinly sliced meat that I have. If I am going meatless, then I will add some fried tofu cubes.

After reading this part, I am certain now you see why I hesitate for so long to share a mi goreng recipe. It’s almost like there is no rule to what you can/cannot add. I would say if you are on a mission to clear your fridge from odd bits and ends, just dump them in your next batch of mi goreng. In short, have fun and happy cooking!

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Pisang Goreng – Indonesian Fried Banana Recipe

It starts to feel like autumn in Oregon, especially with all the rains we’ve been having almost non-stop for the whole week! My cravings for comfort food grows in exponential proportion, and the saba bananas on my countertop that were intended for banana bread seemed to whisper to me, “turn us into pisang goreng …”

Needless to say, the battle of pisang goreng vs. banana bread didn’t last long, and after a little bit of mixing and deep-frying, I happily stuffed my face with as much pisang goreng as my stomach could handle! After I snapped some photos to share, of course. I’m not THAT barbaric!

What you need to make pisang goreng: saba bananas, rice flour, baking powder, and baking soda.

What is pisang goreng?

Pisang goreng is basically bananas coated with batter and deep-fried in hot oil. Once deep-fried, the batter turns crispy, while the banana is of course, sweet and tender.

It sounds so easy, because it is, and yet this humble pisang goreng is a masterpiece despite its simplicity. How else can you explain the need for at least one gorengan (deep-fried snacks, bananas are always the star) seller in every street corner across Indonesia, and none of them seems to be lacking for hungry customers?

Honestly, when I was still in Indonesia, there is almost no incentive to learn to make a proper pisang goreng. Whenever the cravings hit, I simply need to step out from the comfort of my home and walk to the nearest gorengan seller. It would be a surprise if anyone needs more than a 15-minutes walk to spot one of these sellers.

This all changes once you live away from Indonesia for a while, and I am sure many of you have pisang goreng cravings that simply must be quenched! So read on, my dear readers. 🙂

Top: pisang goreng batter made from rice flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, sugar, and turmeric powder. Bottom: peeled saba bananas.

Top: pisang goreng batter made from rice flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, sugar, and turmeric powder. Bottom: peeled saba bananas.

Which bananas should I use to make pisang goreng?

There are several varieties of bananas (and plantains) that are suitable to prepare pisang goreng. The more popular ones include:

  • raja/radja bananas (Indonesian: pisang raja)
  • saba bananas (Indonesian: pisang kepok)
  • plantains (Indonesian: pisang tanduk)

So far, I have only seen saba bananas and plantains in the US. Your best bet to score some saba bananas is through your local Asian market. Plantains are more readily available even in regular stores.

Personally, I prefer raja bananas > saba bananas > plantains, but since I haven’t been able to find any raja bananas yet, I have been making pisang goreng with saba bananas.

Regardless of the variety, it is imperative that you must wait until the bananas/plantains are ripe. This means the skins should be yellow and have dark spots. Be patient and wait for a few days if your bananas/plantains are still green.

Freshly deep-fried pisang goreng (Indonesian fried bananas).

Freshly deep-fried pisang goreng (Indonesian fried bananas).

The all-important batter for crispy pisang goreng

The secret to the crispiest pisang goreng lies in the batter. After many frustrating trials and errors, I am quite happy with this incarnation.

THIS is the batter that finally can make my pisang goreng stays crispy for at least 1 hour, I think it is safe to say they should stay crispy for up to 2 hours!

Unless you somehow need your pisang goreng to stay crispy for more than 2 hours, but why would anyone need that?

Pisang goreng is like french fries, they taste amazing while piping hot, not so when it’s cold and uh, soggy. So ideally, one should consume pisang goreng under 30 minutes, exactly like french fries, or you know, other deep-fried food in general.

My crispy pisang goreng batter

You will need the following ingredients to make the pisang goreng batter:

  • rice flour
  • baking powder
  • baking soda
  • sugar
  • salt
  • turmeric powder (optional)

Simply follow my recipe, and I am quite confident your pisang goreng cravings will be cured. Enjoy!

Taking a bite off the freshly deep-fried pisang goreng (Indonesian fried bananas). So crispy!

Taking a bite off the freshly deep-fried pisang goreng (Indonesian fried bananas). So crispy!

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Kwetiau Goreng – Stir Fried Flat Rice Noodles Recipe

Kwetiau goreng is Chinese stir-fried flat rice noodles. We know it as kwetiau goreng in Indonesia, but the Malaysians/Singaporeans know this as char kway teow, and of course, this dish is known as 炒粿條 for the Chinese.

This dish has so many varieties, and the vegetarian version (known as kwetiau goreng putih/白炒粿條) is the simplest possible incarnation. Once you master the vegetarian version, you can handle any varieties of kwetiau goreng!

Ingredients to prepare kwetiau goreng (fried flat rice noodles): flat rice noodles, yu choy sum, chives, scallions, mung bean sprouts, garlic, and soy sauce.

What you will need for a simple vegetarian kwetiau goreng / fried flat rice noodles

My vegetarian version of kwetiau goreng has the following ingredients:

  • flat rice noodles, choose the widest possible version
  • yu choy sum, or other Chinese greens such as bok choy or gai lan
  • mung bean sprouts
  • chives, if you can’t find this, increase the amount of scallions used
  • scallions
  • garlic
  • soy sauce
  • salt, sugar, and white pepper

Fresh vs. dried flat rice noodles

Some Asian grocery stores stock fresh flat rice noodles, and if you see that, I would highly recommend choosing fresh over the dried version. But, you can successfully make kwetiau goreng even with dried flat rice noodles, just be sure to choose the widest possible versions.

  • For fresh noodles, rinse with boiling water to separate the strands.
  • For dried noodles, soak the noodles in cold water for about 1 hour to soften.

In both cases, you will want to drain the noodles really well before using to prevent splattering of hot oil during the stir fry process.

A plate of vegetarian kwetiau goreng/fried flat rice noodles/char kway teow/炒粿條.

A plate of vegetarian kwetiau goreng/fried flat rice noodles/char kway teow/炒粿條.

How to cook a proper kwetiau goreng/char kway teow

The best tool to cook a proper kwetiau goreng, or any Chinese fried rice or fried noodles dish, is a wok and on high heat. Chinese have a term called “wok hei”, which translates to the breath of the wok.

Whenever we order fried rice/fried noodles from a restaurant, my parents would judge these dishes harshly if they don’t detect the elusive wok hei and just like that, they would never step back into said restaurant.

The story is a bit different for your average home cooks since most household range simply cannot crank up the heat as crazy hot as is required to produce wok hei. But, you still want to invest in a good wok if you want to step up your fried rice/fried noodles game.

The next little trick is speed, from the moment the first ingredients enter the wok to the finished dish, it shouldn’t take any more than 3 minutes! Really, the prep work will take so much longer in comparison to the cooking time.

Always double-check that you have all the ingredients lined up and in order so you can move from one ingredient to another without losing speed.

Line up all your ingredients, from nearest to farthest:

  1. oil
  2. garlic
  3. yu choy sum (or other Chinese greens) and salt
  4. flat rice noodles, mung bean sprouts, and chives
  5. scallions, soy sauce, sugar, and ground white pepper

Here’s the complete step-by-step:

  1. Heat wok until hot and smoking on high heat. (Or medium-high if the smoke might trigger your fire alarm!)
  2. Reduce heat to medium-high, then add oil, swirl around to coat the wok.
  3. Add garlic, stir 30 seconds until garlic is golden brown.
  4. Add yu choy sum and salt, stir 15 seconds to lightly wilt the greens.
  5. Add flat rice noodles, mung bean sprouts, and chives, stir 1 minute.
  6. Add scallions, soy sauce, sugar, and ground white pepper. Stir only to mix.
  7. Remove from heat and immediately transfer to plates and serve!

It only sounds complicated, but I assure you, it is quite easy in practice. Please give this recipe a try, and I am sure you will be able to produce outstanding kwetiau goreng/char kway teow in no time at all. 🙂

A plate of vegetarian kwetiau goreng/fried flat rice noodles/char kway teow/炒粿條.

A plate of vegetarian kwetiau goreng/fried flat rice noodles/char kway teow/炒粿條.

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Sambal Goreng – Fried Chili Paste Recipe

Sambal goreng (fried chili paste) is a basic multi-purpose chili paste that can be the base of many delicious Indonesian spicy dishes, plus it can be enjoyed as is. This chili sauce is especially great with fried food, such as ayam goreng/fried chicken, bakwan/fritters, bakso goreng/fried meatballs, tahu goreng/fried tofu or perkedel/potato fritters.

Ingredients to prepare sambal goreng(fried chili paste): dried red chilies, shallots, garlic, onion, terasi/belacan/shrimp paste, kaffir lime leave, and tamarind.

What do I need to make sambal goreng?

I want my sambal goreng to be full of umami, and for this, I usually use all of these to make my trusted fried chili paste:

  • dried red chilies. My Asian market typically stock chilies from China and from Thailand, the Chinese are usually slightly milder than Thai ones, so choose according to how hot you want your chili paste to be.
  • shallots. I use smaller Chinese/Asian shallots, but regular French shallots are okay too.
  • garlic
  • onion. Choose yellow/white, though, in a pinch, you can use red onion too.
  • terasi/belacan/shrimp paste. This stinky and pungent block of fermented shrimps is the key to umami-rich chili paste, so definitely try to hunt it down. In a really short pinch, you can use fish sauce, but the final chili paste is definitely inferior to the one using terasi/belacan/shrimp paste.
  • kaffir lime leaves. This adds that lovely citrusy fragrance to the chili paste, sub with lime zest in a pinch.
  • tamarind. I usually buy a wet seedless tamarind packet and add water as needed to make my own tamarind paste. In a pinch, you can use tomato paste too, but it will taste slightly different from our traditional chili paste.
How to make sambal goreng: (1) Place shallots, garlic, onion, boiled red chilies, toasted terasi/belacan/shrimp paste, and water in a blender. (2) Blend into a smooth paste. (3) Cook the paste, along with oil, sugar, salt, tamarind, and kaffir lime leaves into sambal goreng (fried chili paste).

How to make sambal goreng: (1) Place shallots, garlic, onion, boiled red chilies, toasted terasi/belacan/shrimp paste, and water in a blender. (2) Blend into a smooth paste. (3) Cook the paste, along with oil, sugar, salt, tamarind, and kaffir lime leaves into sambal goreng (fried chili paste).

How do I make sambal goreng?

Making your very own sambal goreng is quite easy. You will need:

  • a blender
  • a saucepot/a soup pot/a wok

Here is the step-by-step process to cook sambal goreng:

  1. Boil dry chilies in a small pot. Simmer until chilies are soft. This should take about 10 minutes.
  2. Toast terasi/belacan/shrimp paste. The easiest method is using a microwave and cooks for 30 seconds.
  3. Place boiled chilies, shallots, garlic, onion, toasted terasi/belacan/shrimp paste, and water in a blender. Process into a smooth paste.
  4. Transfer the smooth chili paste into a saucepot/soup pot/wok, cook on medium-high until the paste is thicker and drier.
  5. Add oil and kaffir lime leaves to the paste. Stir to mix, and cook for 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to a medium-low and cook for another 20 minutes, or until oil starts to separate from the chili paste. We call this phenomenon “pecah minyak” in Indonesian/Malaysian.
  6. Season with salt, sugar, and tamarind juice. Stir until everything is incorporated into the chili paste. You may adjust the amount of sugar/salt to suit your taste.

And our sambal goreng is done! You now have the option to store them for longer storage or enjoy the chili paste immediately.

Sambal goreng - fried chili paste. This recipe yields 4 cups of chili paste, be sure to store them in sterilized jars.

Sambal goreng – fried chili paste. This recipe yields 4 cups of chili paste, be sure to store them in sterilized jars.

How to store and use Indonesian sambal goreng?

This recipe will yield about 4 cups of sambal goreng. I usually divide the chili paste into 4 portions, 1 cup each, and store in sterilized glass jars. Any unopened jar of chili paste should last for up to 2 months in the fridge. Once opened and used, you want to finish it within a week.

How do I use this sambal goreng?

Sambal goreng is basically one of Indonesian handy instant sauce. Arm with this, we can make delicious dishes within minutes. The guide to make a sambal goreng dish is like so:

  • 1/2 cup of sambal goreng/fried chili paste
  • 500 gram (1 lb.) of meat, seafood, vegetables, egg, tofu, or tempeh

Basically, you need to only heat the chili paste in a frying pan/wok, then add your choice of protein/vegetables. Stir, cook, and toss until the protein/vegetables are cooked and coated. If you want some examples of authentic Indonesian dishes made with this handy chili paste, you can try some of these recipes:

Based on these examples, feel free to create your own sambal goreng dishes. Have fun and enjoy. 🙂

Sambal goreng - fried chili paste. Enjoy as is, or use it to cook a variety of easy and delicious sambal goreng dishes.

Sambal goreng – fried chili paste. Enjoy as is, or use it to cook a variety of easy and delicious sambal goreng dishes.

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