Tag Archives: Ogura

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake Recipe

I have been dying to try out ogura cake every since they got popular back in the early 2000’s. Despite its Japanese sounding name, this cake hails from Malaysia. The best texture I can describe when you bite into a piece of ogura cake is its impossibly airy and soft texture. Though it looks like sponge cake, it is closer to a chiffon cake. And since I have tons of cheese sitting around in my home right now, I decided to bake this cheesy pillowy ogura cake.

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

First technique: beat your eggs properly

Baking an ogura cake is all about mastering the right techniques, and the first is making sure to beat your eggs properly. You will need two mixing bowls for this.

The first mixing bowl has your egg whites, cream of tartar, and sugar. This you need to whisk until stiff, roughly around a medium peak is good.

The next bowl is where you add have everything else (minus flours) and beat until thick, then add the flours and whisk just until combined.

Next, fold the egg white batter into the egg yolk batter in three additions.

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

Second technique: line your pan

You want to use an 8″x8″ square cake pan and you must line it with parchment paper. Why? Because it is the easiest method to remove the cake without them sticking to the pan. And I always make sure the parchment hangs over the pan so I can grab the paper and remove the cake easily.

Now, if your batter was properly mixed, you will notice air bubbles when you pour the batter into the pan. These air bubbles are key to produce that elusive pillowy texture. If you don’t see air bubbles when pouring your batter, it is almost a guarantee your cake will be dense.

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

Third technique: au bain marie

Ogura cake must be baked with au bain marie method. It sounds so complicated, but it simply means you place your cake pan onto a baking sheet. Then, you pour hot boiling water to fill the baking sheet to about 1/2″ deep.

It is best if you pour your water with kettle, or something that has a proper spout, like a measuring cup, just to make sure you don’t accidentally pour hot water into your cake pan!

Anyway, au bain marie simply means we not only bake the cake, but we steam it at the same time. If you do all the above, you should end up with a great ogura cake. So have fun baking, and who say you cannot eat the cake too!

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

Cheesy Pillowy Ogura Cake

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Matcha Ogura Cake Recipe | Daily Cooking Quest

Matcha Ogura Cake.

An ogura cake is a Malaysian cake with a fluffy and cloud-like texture. It is almost as soft, if not softer, than a chiffon cake. If you love chiffon cakes, you will love ogura cakes.

I am combining ogura cake with matcha (Japanese green tea powder) to create this recipe. I love desserts with matcha as I love the slight bitterness and the fresh tea flavor. If you are a matcha lover, I am sure you will love this cake.

This matcha ogura cake is my second ogura cake recipe. For cheese lovers, you will want to try my cheesy pillowy ogura cake, using cheddar and parmesan cheese.

Ingredients for matcha ogura cake: all-purpose flour, cornstarch, matcha, milk, oil, eggs, sugar, and vinegar.

Ingredients for matcha ogura cake: all-purpose flour, cornstarch, matcha, milk, oil, eggs, sugar, and vinegar.

Ingredients for Ogura Matcha Cake

  • all-purpose flour
  • cornstarch
  • matcha (Japanese green tea powder)
  • eggs
  • neutral flavor oil, such as vegetable oil or canola oil
  • milk
  • sugar
  • vinegar/lime juice/cream of tartar, to help stabilized whipped egg whites

All-purpose flour and cornstarch

I use a combination of all-purpose flour and cornstarch to lower the protein in the all-purpose flour. This combination has a similar protein content to cake flour.

TIPS: You can use 80 grams of cake flour instead of 65 grams of all-purpose flour plus 15 grams of cornstarch.

Matcha (Japanese green tea powder)

Matcha comes in two varieties, cooking grade and ceremonial grade. For baking and cooking purposes, cooking grade matcha from a good brand is good enough.

A tiny can of matcha is enough to bake plenty of cakes. Matcha gradually loses its vibrancy due to oxidation once you open the package. To make sure you get the most out of your matcha, I recommend buying a smaller quantity and using it as soon as you open the can.

(1) Beat egg yolks, 1 egg, oil, milk, all-purpose flour, cornstarch, and matcha into a smooth batter. (2) Whisk egg whites, vinegar, and sugar into a stiff peak. (3) Fold egg white into egg yolk batter. (4) Matcha ogura batter.

(1) Beat egg yolks, 1 egg, oil, milk, all-purpose flour, cornstarch, and matcha into a smooth batter. (2) Whisk egg whites, vinegar, and sugar into a stiff peak. (3) Fold egg white into egg yolk batter. (4) Matcha ogura batter.

Prep work for baking a matcha ogura cake

  1. Preheat the oven to 320 Fahrenheit (160 Celsius).
  2. Line an 8-inch square pan (8″x8″x2″) with parchment paper.
  3. Boil a kettle of water.
  4. Prepare an empty baking tray such as a half-sheet pan, a 9″x13″ pan, or a roasting pan.

The boiling water and the empty baking tray are necessary for baking the cake with a water-bath (bain-marie) method.

Pour the batter into an 8 inch square pan lined with parchment paper.

Pour the batter into an 8 inch square pan lined with parchment paper.

Baking a matcha ogura cake

1. Prepare egg yolk batter

Beat all-purpose flour, cornstarch, matcha, milk, oil, egg yolks, and one egg in a mixing bowl until thick and slightly pale.

2. Whisk egg whites

In another large mixing bowl, whisk egg whites with vinegar/lime juice/cream of tartar until foamy.

Add sugar in three batches and continue whisking until the egg whites reach a medium peak.

3. Matcha ogura batter

Fold egg white batter to the egg yolk batter with a whisk (or a spatula) in three batches. Be careful not to destroy the air bubbles.

4. Bake the cake

Pour the batter into the parchment-lined cake pan.

Place an empty baking sheet (a half-sheet pan/9″x13″ pan/roasting pan) in the middle rack of the oven.

Place the square cake pan on the empty baking tray.

Pour boiling water from the kettle onto the baking tray (NOT your cake pan!) to fill about 1/2″ of the baking tray.

TIPS: You must use boiling water, or the cake will not rise properly.

Bake for 55-60 minutes or until the cake is golden brown and a cake tester comes out clean.

Bake the cake with a water bath method at 320 Fahrenheit (160 Celsius) for an hour.

Bake the cake with a water bath method at 320 Fahrenheit (160 Celsius) for an hour.

Serving the cake

Remove the cake from the oven and set it aside to cool in the pan for 5 minutes.

Gently remove the cake from the pan by grabbing the parchment paper and placing it on a wire rack to cool completely.

Once the cake is cool to touch, cut it into 9-16 servings.

I usually serve the cake with hot tea or hot coffee. For matcha lovers, I think it is best to pair this cake with matcha tea or matcha latte.

Remove the cake from the pan and once cool, cut into 9-16 servings.

Remove the cake from the pan and once cool, cut into 9-16 servings.

Other matcha recipes to try

If you are wondering how to finish your matcha, why not give these recipes a try:

Matcha Ogura Cake.

Matcha Ogura Cake.

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