Tag Archives: Padang

Gulai Telur Padang – Eggs Braised in Spicy Coconut Broth Recipe

Gulai Telur Padang – Eggs Braised in Spicy Coconut Broth

Eggs are my go-to easy dishes. I love making hard-boiled eggs, and then further cook them in delicious sauces like this gulai telur Padang.

You can fry the hard-boiled eggs in hot oil first to create a blistered golden brown crust on the eggs. I usually skip this step, but the ones sold in Padang restaurants usually have this golden brown crust, so it is up to you if you want to or not.

Gulai Padang sauce

The sauce is simple, just need to gather the ingredients and make a spice paste with food processor or blender.

You will need lemongrass, shallot, garlic, bird eye chilies, candlenuts (or macadamia), ginger, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, daun salam, tumeric powder, and coconut milk.

If bird eye chilies are too spicy for your liking, feel free to use milder varieties, such as cayenne, or even Fresno. Just make sure to use red color chilies.

Daun salam is Indonesian bay leaves. The flavor is super different compared to regular bay leaves. So if you can’t find daun salam, the best option would be to simply omit them.

Gulai Telur Padang - Eggs Braised in Spicy Coconut Broth

Gulai Telur Padang – Eggs Braised in Spicy Coconut Broth

How to cook gulai telur Padang?

First, sauté spice paste and all seasoning ingredients until fragrant and the color turns into a darker shade.

Then, add water and coconut milk and bring to a boil. Add the peeled hard boiled eggs and simmer for 15 minutes until the sauce thickens.

Turn off the heat, discard the leaves, and serve gulai telur padang with steamed white rice.

A typical packet of nasi Padang

Typically if you buy a packet of Padang rice meal, you get a serving of rice, a serving of egg (gulai telur or telur balado, you get to choose usually), a serving of vegetables, and a serving of meat (rendang, gulai ayam, ayam bakar, ayam pop), and a generous amount of sambal lado.

A rice packet like this is very filling and most likely costs less than $2, a truly delicious and satisfying meal at a very reasonable price. Give it a try if you ever visit Indonesia 🙂

Gulai Telur Padang - Eggs Braised in Spicy Coconut Broth

Gulai Telur Padang – Eggs Braised in Spicy Coconut Broth

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Bakso Sapi Saus Padang – Indonesian Spicy Meatballs Recipe

Spicy food lovers rejoice! Today I am sharing this wonderfully umami loaded bakso sapi saus Padang – Indonesian spicy meatballs with you. There are two parts of the recipe, making the meatballs, and the amazingly delicious saus Padang (spicy tomato and chili sauce). I get it that some don’t eat beef in their diets, like my Mom, so feel free to sub with ground chicken or ground pork for the meatballs. Regardless of your meat choice, I promise it will come out ah-may-zing!

Bakso Sapi Saus Padang – Indonesian Spicy Meatballs

Bakso Sapi (Beef Meatballs)

There is nothing exceptionally different in making Indonesian style meatballs (bakso) compared to its Western counterpart. The main different lies more in cooking process. There are two main ways in cooking the meatballs, either we boil them in plenty of water, or we deep fry them in super hot oil. We are going to go with the first method for this recipe.

Bakso Sapi Saus Padang - Indonesian Spicy Meatballs

Bakso Sapi Saus Padang – Indonesian Spicy Meatballs

Saus Padang (Umami Rich Tomato and Chili Sauce)

Padang cuisine is famous for its spicy and savory dishes and is one of the most beloved in the country. There is a saying that no matter where you are in Indonesia, there will be at least one Padang restaurant to satisfy your craving. But saus Padang, literally Padang sauce, has nothing to do with the distinguished cuisine. Instead, this sauce is basically a super spicy tomato sauce consists mainly of tomato ketchup, chili sauce, and oyster sauce, with aromatics such as onion, garlic, and ginger. I’m guessing it starts as some signature sauce in a restaurant that somehow gets adopted widely around the country.

Bakso Sapi Saus Padang - Indonesian Spicy Meatballs

Bakso Sapi Saus Padang – Indonesian Spicy Meatballs

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Rendang Sapi Padang – Padang Style Beef Rendang Recipe

Rendang sapi (beef rendang) is probably the most well known Padang dish, and surprisingly easy to make at home, since most of the time you just need to let it simmer away on a stove.

The key to successful rendang is not to skimp on the herbs and spices, and be prepared for a long stewing process resulting in a flavorful and tender melt in your mouth pieces of beef.

In short, good stuff which I guarantee a bite of this will have you nodding in agreement with all the people who have voted rendang to be the world’s most delicious food.

Ingredients to prepare rendang sapi Padang (Padang style beef rendang).

The herbs and spices you need to prepare for a rendang dish

After so many years of tweaking and tinkering my beef rendang recipe, for the moment, I am highly satisfied with this version to recreate my beloved beef rendang, Padang style. But be warned, the long list of ingredients is definitely not for the faint of heart.

The essentials

For me, the following is the minimum amount of herbs and spices that you definitely must incorporate in your beef rendang:

Tamarind is the easiest to procure in the United States, followed with black kokum, but in Indonesia, we usually use asam kandis, or asam gelugur to prepare rendang dishes.

The extras, but oh so worth it

And here are the list of herbs and spices that may be safely omitted, though if you are willing to go the extra mile, you won’t regret adding some, if not all, of the following:

From my own experience, other than turmeric leaves, you should be able to buy the rest of the ingredients in the United States. If you have green thumbs, you can buy some fresh turmeric roots and grow turmeric plants and harvest the fresh leaves to use for all your rendang dishes.

Rendang sapi Padang - Indonesian beef rendang, Padang style.

Rendang sapi Padang – Indonesian beef rendang, Padang style.

Which beef cut is suitable for beef rendang?

Rendang is a dish with long hours of slowly simmering away in a pot (most Indonesians use a wok actually), until all the liquid is reduced into a glaze! As such, you want to stick with beef cuts that are highly suitable for stew or braising. My favorites include:

  • beef chuck
  • beef shank, also known as shin
  • beef bottom round/rump roast (in the US), or silverside (outside of the US)
  • beef brisket

The first three are more commonly used to cook beef rendang, but you can also use brisket too. If your grocery only carries beef cubes that are labeled as beef stew, you can use that too, just make sure they are around 2-inch cubes.

Rendang sapi Padang - Indonesian beef rendang, Padang style.

Rendang sapi Padang – Indonesian beef rendang, Padang style.

What is the difference between Padang style beef rendang to others?

The biggest difference between Padang style beef rendang compared to other beef rendang is the lack of ambu-ambu, or kerisik.

What is ambu-ambu/kerisik?

Ambu-ambu, or kerisik as they are known in Malaysian, is a buttery concoction made from toasted grated coconut. It’s actually very easy to make, simply dry fry freshly grated coconut until toasty and golden brown, then ground this until the toasted grated coconut becomes an oily paste.

So, can I use ambu-ambu/kerisik for my rendang if I wish to?

If you are used to beef rendang that includes this ingredient, feel free to add some kerisik (about 4 tablespoon) near the end of your cooking, typically right before it’s done.

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Gulai Ayam Padang – Padang Chicken Curry Recipe

Gulai Ayam Padang – Padang Chicken Curry.

Indonesia is a big country, and cuisines of many regions combined make up what we know as Indonesian cuisine. Among its many cuisines, Padang is easily my favorite.

Some of popular Padang dishes that you may have heard of include rendang, ayam pop, ayam panggang, balado, perkedel, sambal lado, gulai nangka, gulai daun singkong, soto Padang, and many more. If I were to eat just Padang dishes for the rest of my days, I don’t think I will complain much. 🙂

I am going to share my recipe for Gulai Ayam Padang today. I love that this dish has plenty of delicious sauce that is just perfect with some steamed rice. I never throw away the extra sauce even when all the chicken is gone. The extra curry sauce elevates a humble meal of steamed rice and fried egg into a delicious meal.

Ingredients for gulai ayam Padang (Padang chicken curry): chicken, coconut milk, coconut palm sugar, garlic, shallot, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, ginger, galangal, tamarind, red chilies, cloves, star anise, cinnamon, cardamom, candlenuts, salt, cumin, turmeric, and coriander.

Ingredients for gulai ayam Padang (Padang chicken curry): chicken, coconut milk, coconut palm sugar, garlic, shallot, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, ginger, galangal, tamarind, red chilies, cloves, star anise, cinnamon, cardamom, candlenuts, salt, cumin, turmeric, and coriander.

Ingredients for gulai ayam Padang

1. Chicken

Most Padang restaurants in Indonesia use ayam kampung for their chicken dishes. Ayam kampung is the equivalent of a free-range chicken, and it is usually smaller and lighter compared to farmed chicken. You can use a whole chicken, cut up into 8-12 pieces.

I usually use chicken leg quarters, cut into thighs and drumsticks. If you choose this option, you will need about 4-5 chicken quarters for this recipe.

2. Fresh ingredients

We will need garlic, shallot, red chilies, ginger, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves.

For the red chilies, most Indonesians usually use either bird-eye or cayenne chilies. Bird-eye will be hotter than cayenne, but if you want an even milder dish, you can use Fresno chilies too. You can also use dried red chilies when you are running out of fresh chilies.

3. Dry/pantry ingredients

We will need salt, coconut palm sugar, coriander, cumin, turmeric, cinnamon, star anise, cloves, cardamom, candlenuts, tamarind, and coconut milk.

(1) Prepare the spice paste in a food processor. (2) Sauté spice paste, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, cinnamon, star anise, cloves, cardamom, cumin, turmeric, and coriander. (3) Add chicken and cook until no longer pink. (4) Add water and season with salt, coconut palm sugar, and tamarind. Cook until the chicken is soft before adding coconut milk.

(1) Prepare the spice paste in a food processor. (2) Sauté spice paste, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, cinnamon, star anise, cloves, cardamom, cumin, turmeric, and coriander. (3) Add chicken and cook until no longer pink. (4) Add water and season with salt, coconut palm sugar, and tamarind. Cook until the chicken is soft before adding coconut milk.

How to cook gulai ayam Padang

1. Prepare spice paste

Use a food processor or a mortar and pestle to grind garlic, shallot, red chilies, ginger, galangal, and candlenuts into a smooth paste.

2. Sauté spices and aromatics

Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a wok over medium heat and sauté spice paste, bruised lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, cinnamon, smashed cardamom, cloves, star anise, coriander, cumin, and turmeric. Stir until fragrant, about 5 minutes.

3. Sauté chicken

Add chicken to the wok and stir to coat with the spices. Cook until the chicken is no longer pink.

4. Add seasonings and water

Add salt, coconut palm sugar, tamarind, and water. Mix and cook until boiling. Reduce the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 30 minutes, or until the chicken is soft and tender.

5. Add coconut milk

Stir in coconut milk and continue simmering for another 15 minutes. Turn off the heat, and serve the chicken curry with steamed white rice.

Serve gulai ayam padang (Padang chicken curry) immediately with steamed white rice, though the flavor improves with age and it tastes even better on the second or third day.

Serve gulai ayam padang (Padang chicken curry) immediately with steamed white rice, though the flavor improves with age and it tastes even better on the second or third day.

Create a complete Padang rice set (a.k.a. nasi Padang)

It is said that no matter where you go in Indonesia, you are bound to find at least one amazing Padang restaurant. For most Indonesians, a packet of nasi Padang (Padang rice set) is considered a happy and complete meal.

A typical Padang rice set will have a serving of steamed rice, a serving of meat, a serving of vegetables, and a serving of sambal (chili sauce).

Gulai ayam Padang is one of the many great choices to get for the meat, though other choices such as rendang, ayam pop, or ayam panggang are excellent choices as well.

For the vegetables, you can choose from a balado, perkedel, gulai nangka, or gulai daun singkong.

When it comes to Padang cuisine, the best and most famous chili sauce without a doubt is sambal lado. But if you don’t have the ingredients for it, it is not a bad idea to serve nasi Padang with sambal terasi or sambal bajak too.

To replicate a Padang restaurant experience, ladle a piece or two of the chicken to individual serving plate along with a generous amount of sauce.

To replicate a Padang restaurant experience, ladle a piece or two of the chicken to individual serving plate along with a generous amount of sauce.

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