Tag Archives: Taro

Talas Goreng – Taro Fritters Recipe

When I was still in primary school, one of my favorite snack is talas goreng (taro fritters) sold nearby my school. The seller has a metal box attached to the back of his bicycle, and in it are the perfectly fried taro fritters. Once an order is placed, he would cut each taro fritter into smaller bite size pieces (we are all tiny back then), place the taro pieces in a super eco friendly dish made from banana leaves, pour some chili sauce on the taro fritters, and lastly stick a piece of bamboo skewer before handing the whole thing to the hungry little customers. So, so, so good.

Taro Julienne

Before we can make some taro fritters, we will need some taro root, some dried shrimps (Indonesian: ebi), and salted soy beans (Indonesian: tauco). We will also need tapioca starch, all purpose flour, rice flour, garlic, salt, and sugar. You should be able to find dried shrimps in the frozen sections alongside salted fish, salted squid, e.t.c., or you can get one from Amazon too if that’s easier. For salted soy beans, the brand that I like most that I can find in United States here is Yeo’s salted soy beans, you can use other brand too of course.

Talas Goreng - Taro Fritters

Talas Goreng – Taro Fritters

First of all, let’s make taro juliennes/sticks with either a grater or a knife, then place them in a mixing bowl and set aside. Make spice paste by grinding together soaked dried shrimps, salted soy beans, and garlic in a food processor. Combine spice paste with the taro juliennes, then add tapioca starch, all purpose flour, rice flour, sugar, salt, and water, mixing everything together into a thick batter. Finally, we can start frying the batter to make taro fritters, either with deep frying or pan frying.

Talas Goreng - Taro Fritters

Talas Goreng – Taro Fritters

It is best to enjoy taro fritters when they are piping hot. A dab of chili sauce, such as sambal lampung (lampung chili sauce) or garlic and chili sweet sauce, goes really well with the fritters.

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Taro Swirl Bread Recipe | Daily Cooking Quest

Today, I am sharing a recipe to make taro swirl bread. I use taro paste from my previous taro paste recipe, so if you want to make this bread, please refer to my previous recipe to make taro paste before hand. Or, if you want, you can use red bean paste too to make this lovely looking swirl bread.

Step by step to make taro swirl bread.

I use killer toast bread dough from Victoria Bakes. You can use other kind of bread dough too if you have your favorite bread dough to work with, but nowadays I use killer toast bread dough for about 70% of the bread I make, so I highly recommend this if you are still looking for your go-to bread dough recipe.

Taro swirl bread; left: prior to proofing; right: after proofing.

Taro swirl bread; left: prior to proofing; right: after proofing.

Whichever bread dough recipe you follow, the most important point is to knead your bread until it is really soft, smooth, non-sticky, non-oily, and elastic. At the end of kneading, we want the bread to read a stage that bakers like to call window pane stage. This stage means that you can stretch the bread dough without the dough tearing, and it should be thin enough that light can shine through the stretched dough (a.k.a. like window letting light through). If your dough hasn’t reached this window pane stage, you know that you should keep kneading the dough.

Taro Swirl Bread

Taro Swirl Bread

In any case, once you are ready to shape the bread, divide the dough into 8 portions. I think it is much easier if you can follow my step-by-step photo above on how to make taro swirl bread. Roll each portion into an oblong shape (about 3″x5″), spread taro paste on half of the dough with about 0.5″ of the edges uncovered. Fold the dough to encase the filling, pinch the edges so the paste doesn’t leak out. Make two slits lengthwise. Pull slightly while twisting the dough a couple of times. Create a ring by connecting the two ends. Place swirled dough on to a greased and floured 9″ cake pan. Repeat for the other 7 portions.

Taro Swirl Bread

Taro Swirl Bread

Cover the cake pan with a wet kitchen towel/saran plastic wrap, and let the dough proof until the volume is doubled, about 1 hour in a warm kitchen. Once the dough has finished proofing, preheat oven to 180 Celsius (350 Fahrenheit). Make an egg wash by mixing together 1 egg + 1 teaspoon of milk/water. Brush the top of bread dough liberally with egg wash, and bake in the preheated oven for about 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown.

Taro Swirl Bread

Taro Swirl Bread

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Taro Paste Recipe | Daily Cooking Quest

Ingredients to Prepare Taro Paste: Taro, Coconut Milk, and Sugar.

Have you ever visited Asian bakerie and look at the pretty purple color from their taro baked goods?

Actually, you can make taro paste easily at home, just with a handful of ingredients: taro root, coconut milk, and sugar. You won’t get the shocking bright purple color though (I suspect the ones from the bakery are most likely artificial), but what you will get is a pretty pink hue sweet paste.

You can use taro paste for all sort of dessert, like for steamed buns (Chinese bao/mantou), bread filling, mochi filling, even mooncake filling.

And if you want to go with western dessert, mix this taro paste with a bit of butter (or coconut cream) to make the paste more like buttercream consistency and use as your cake/cupcake frosting!

Steamed and Mashed Taro.

Steamed and Mashed Taro.

Taro Roots

Taro roots are usually available in most Chinese grocery stores. Sometimes you can find them fresh, in which case you will need to peel the rough brown skin to reveal the whitish flesh with pink/purple vein/thread.

Some people can feel itchy from handling taro, so if you have a pair of disposable gloves, it is a very good idea to wear those while handling taro.

Most likely though, you will find the roots already peeled and vacuum packed, which is very convenient since the store already does the prep work of peeling the skin away for you.

Since we will be steaming the roots, it is best to chop them into smaller chunks. I like to chop them into roughly 1″ cubes.

Once they are chopped, you can steam the taro until fork tender. You can then mashed the steamed taro root with either a fork, a potato masher, or even a food processor if you don’t want to do it manually.

Cooked Taro Paste.

Cooked Taro Paste.

Cook the Steamed Taro with Coconut Milk and Sugar into Taro Paste

Once you have mashed/pureed steamed taro, transfer to a frying pan (it doesn’t have to be non-stick, I use my stainless steel pan for this) along with coconut milk and sugar.

Cook all these three ingredients together over medium-low heat, and stir until everything is homogenous.

Stir regularly until a paste is formed. There should be no standing liquid and the paste should be smooth.

For me, 200 gram of sugar is generally sweet enough, but you can increase the amount of sugar to 250 gram, or even 300 gram, if you prefer sweeter paste.

Taro Paste, Cooked, Cooled, and Ready to be Stored.

Taro Paste, Cooked, Cooled, and Ready to be Stored.

Transfer to Jars/Containers for Longer Storage

This recipe should yield about 3 cups of taro paste. For ease of storage and usage, I usually store each cup individually.

Whenever I make a batch of bread, steamed buns, or pastry, I typically only need one cup per batch, so storing my homemade taro paste into separate containers per cup make the most sense for me.

I hope you will give this recipe a try, and hopefully this will end up being one of your favorite Asian sweet paste that you can use for many purposes: bread, steamed buns, mochi, mooncakes, and even for Western-style pastries.

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